Categories
Reviews

Review: Ultimate Rave

Hi again! As promised, I’m back with my review of the new Ultimate Rave collection, which went up today on Spectrum Culture:

Review: Ultimate Rave

I wish I could say that the critics had been wrong all along and this is a buried, misunderstood gem, but quite frankly, it isn’t; even 20 years later, this is still one of (the Artist Formerly Known as) Prince’s most deeply mediocre records. But I find that the additional hindsight, as well as Sony Legacy’s excellent presentation, has made me a lot more affectionate than I may have been otherwise. I look forward to this deluxe treatment being given to more of the albums that deserve it!

In the meantime, if you’re interested in supporting this release but have found the price tag too steep, at time of posting it’s a little less than $16 on Amazon; that’s about $10 less than I paid for it, even lower compared to list price. And if you use my affiliate link, you can support me, too!

Okay, that’s enough shilling for one day. See you tomorrow!

Categories
Uncategorized

Prince Track by Track: “Pretty Man”

I know, I know, I’m running behind again. But part three of “Controversy” will be out soon–no promises, but I’m aiming for this week–and once that monolith is out of the way I expect things to pick up accordingly. In the meantime, here’s my latest appearance on Darren Husted’s Prince: Track by Track podcast, talking about the hidden track that may technically be my favorite song on Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic:

Prince Track by Track: “Pretty Man”

Thanks to those of you who have been waiting patiently for the next d / m / s / r post, as well as the likely much larger number of you who don’t give a shit!

Categories
Ephemera, 1975-1976

Sweet Thing

In his recent cover story for Rolling Stone, reporter Brian Hiatt writes about what would become his final visit to Prince’s Paisley Park complex, in January of 2014. At one point, he describes standing in front of a mural “where a painted image of Prince, arms spread, stands astride images of his influences and artists he, in turn, influenced” (Hiatt 2016). Among the “influences” depicted in the mural are the usual suspects from Prince’s Grand Central days–Sly and the Family Stone, Tower of Power, Grand Funk Railroad–as well as Chaka Khan.