Podcast: The Most Beautiful – Part 3 of a Conversation with Jane Clare Jones

Podcast: The Most Beautiful – Part 3 of a Conversation with Jane Clare Jones

(Featured Image: Mayte and O(+> in their wedding program, 1996; © Noelle-Elaine Media Consultants.)

Way back in mid-April, I spoke with writer, philosopher, and fellow Prince obsessive Jane Clare Jones for so long that our conversation ended up being split into four parts; but by the end of that conversation, we were also talking around things more often than we were talking about them. So, last week, we got together for a redo. The resulting podcast is a Frankenstein’s monster–but a fun, interesting Frankenstein’s monster!–of our original discussion on Mayte’s The Most Beautiful (placed, for maximum confusion, at the end) and some setup for the things we were talking around–which we’ll finally address in our episode next week. We also take advantage of the passage of time by discussing some of the major developments in the Princeverse last month: the Celebration, “Deliverance,” and that godawful TV movie.  I promise it’s all a lot more coherent than it sounds.

You can listen to the podcast here or on any of the major aggregators: iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Play; feel free also to subscribe and leave a review on the service of your choice. We should have it up on Mixcloud soon, too. If you’re just coming in now, you can–and should!–check out the first and second episodes here. As always, thanks for listening!

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Podcast: A Year Without Prince – Part 1 of a Conversation with Jane Clare Jones

Podcast: A Year Without Prince – Part 1 of a Conversation with Jane Clare Jones

 

(Featured Image: Parade, 1986; photo by Jeff Katz, © Warner Bros.)

Last Sunday, I spoke with writer, philosopher, and fellow Prince obsessive Jane Clare Jones about…well, a lot of things, which is why we ended up having to break our podcast up into four episodes. For this first installment, we talk about our stories as Prince fans and articulate some of the reasons why his music–and, to a not-insignificant extent, the man himself–continues to mean so much to us. In the weeks to come, I’ll post the later installments, where we discuss the two recent books by Ben Greenman and Mayte Garcia, and try to unpack some of our thoughts around Prince’s death last April. I hope you enjoy it.

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Andresmusictalk: The 8 Records I’m Most Excited about Not Buying for Record Store Day 2017

Andresmusictalk: The 8 Records I’m Most Excited about Not Buying for Record Store Day 2017

(Featured Image: Christopher Tracy’s word game in Under the Cherry Moon, 1986; © Warner Bros.)

It’s been a while since I made a Prince-related guest post on Andresmusictalk–and, to be honest, this one stretches the definition of “Prince-related.” But with Record Store Wrecka Stow Day coming up in two weeks, and at least two Prince-related exclusives on the list of releases, maybe at least a few of my readers will be interested. I’m not making it this year (hence the eight records I’m excited about “not” buying), but if anybody out there is lucky enough to snag that “Little Red Corvette” picture disc, let me know so I can froth with the appropriate amount of jealousy:

The 8 Records I’m Most Excited about Not Buying for Record Store Day 2017

I’ll be back Monday with a review of the new memoir by Prince’s ex-wife, Mayte Garcia (spoiler alert: I liked it). The next “real” post should be going up Wednesday or Thursday. And I have some other exciting stuff planned, so stay tuned!

When We’re Dancing Close and Slow

When We’re Dancing Close and Slow

(Featured Image: Joni Mitchell by Norman Seeff, 1976.)

Prince, as we’ve noted before, had a tendency to distance himself from his second album in the years following its release; he seemed to consider its unabashedly commercial nature a compromise of his artistic ideals. And while I don’t necessarily agree with those views–I think Prince holds up very well as an album, hit-thirst be damned–when I look at the first side of the record in particular, I can kind of see his point. It is, as much as For You had been, a transparent proof of concept for Prince as an artist, presenting in turn each distinct facet of his musical personality circa 1979: opening with the frothy pop-funk hit, following it up with the bid for rock credibility, then moving straight into the dance-club heater. It’s as if he sequenced the first half of the album specifically for the charts he wanted it to make: Soul, Top 40, Disco. So it shouldn’t be much of a surprise that track four, and the Side B closer, represented that other crucial component of his signature sound: the seductive R&B ballad.

As predictable as it might seem at face value, though, “When We’re Dancing Close and Slow” is actually a pretty unusual track. Where later Prince ballads like 1981’s “Do Me, Baby”–actually demoed in early 1979 by André Cymone–sound like the archetypal post-Quiet Storm slow jams that they are, this song’s closest sonic precedent is “So Blue”: an oddball album cut from the second side of For You. Like that earlier song, “Close and Slow” owes as much of its ambience to folk-infused 1970s soft rock as to any kind of R&B; in particular, it’s another early signal of Prince’s artistic debt to Joni Mitchell.

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