Podcast: Prince (1979) Revisited

Podcast: Prince (1979) Revisited

(Featured Image: Cover art for Prince, 1979; photo by Jurgen Reisch, © Warner Bros.)

October 19, 2018 marks the 39th anniversary of Prince’s self-titled second album–not the most glamorous occasion, perhaps, but reason enough to reassemble the review panel from our For You podcast for a reappraisal. Once again, Zach is joined by Harold and KaNisa for a track-by-track discussion of this underappreciated album, its resonances throughout Prince’s career, and why it still matters.

If you want to keep in the loop for our forthcoming Dirty Mind podcast, you can subscribe to dance / music / sex / romance on your aggregator of choice (iTunesStitcher, or Google Play); and if you like what we’re doing and want to spread the word, please leave us a review! In the meantime, the d / m / s / r blog will return next week with one last track from 1981.

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Our Destiny/Roadhouse Garden

Our Destiny/Roadhouse Garden

(Featured Image: Prince at his 26th birthday concert, First Avenue, June 7, 1984. Photo stolen from Prince Off the Record; check it out for a very nice review of the show!)

Well, folks, the podcast episode I promised yesterday isn’t going to happen until early next week; I simply didn’t have enough time to finish editing. Luckily, though, Warner Bros. has my back, because last night they surprise-released another advance track from the new Purple Rain reissue: the studio-recorded medley of “Our Destiny” and “Roadhouse Garden.” So, rather than completely skip a post today, let’s take a short look at these songs and how they fit into the grander scheme of Prince’s work.

Like the previously-discussed “Electric Intercourse,” “Our Destiny”/”Roadhouse Garden” has advance notoriety among hardcore fans and collectors–though, in this case, its connection to the Purple Rain project is much less clear. Prince and the Revolution performed the song only once, at his 26th birthday celebration at Minneapolis’ First Avenue on June 7, 1984: the same concert that yielded the basic track for Jill Jones’ “All Day, All Night.” And as all of us Prince obsessives know, that might as well have been a decade after the previous year’s August 3 First Avenue date, which similarly provided the majority of Purple Rain’s second side. By summer of 1984, Prince was already hard at work on his next project(s), including tracks that would end up on 1985’s Around the World in a Day.

Adding to the confusion, Roadhouse Garden would later become the title of an aborted late-’90s compilation of refurbished Revolution tracks by the artist then-formerly known as Prince–most of which seemed to date from what Princeologists would consider to be the “Dream Factory era” of 1985-1986. This, in turn, appears to have transformed in many fans’ reckonings into a whole other album between Purple Rain and Around the World in a Day, possibly also called Roadhouse Garden. Basically, the song’s provenance is a mess, and I’ve seen more than a few people cry foul over its and its sister song’s inclusion in what “should” be a compilation of outtakes specifically related to Purple Rain.

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Welcome 2 the Dawn: Grading the Purple Rain Deluxe Edition against My Own Expectations

Welcome 2 the Dawn: Grading the Purple Rain Deluxe Edition against My Own Expectations

(Featured Image: The new, shiny Purple Rain cover; © Warner Bros./NPG Records)

Three years ago (and again six months ago), I tried to predict the contents of the new deluxe edition of Purple Rain. So, now that we have an official track list, I thought it would be fun to use my weekly guest post on Andresmusictalk as an opportunity to “grade” myself on my predictions. You can see the results here:

Welcome 2 the Dawn: Grading the Purple Rain Deluxe Edition against My Own Expectations

This seems like an appropriate time to remind everyone that the deluxe and “Deluxe Expanded” versions of Purple Rain are available for preorder, and you can support the blog by using my affiliate link to purchase them (or anything else) from Amazon. In less sales-pitchy news, this week I’m writing about the final circulating Prince song of 1979; you can also expect the last installment of my podcast with Jane Clare Jones by the end of the week. See you again soon!

The Rebels: A Retrospective from an Alternate Timeline

The Rebels: A Retrospective from an Alternate Timeline

(Featured Image: Cover of The Rebels, 1980; © Warner Bros.)

Note: Just in case there is any confusion, the below is entirely made up, albeit with perhaps an excess of dedication to historical plausibility. See my previous “Alternate Timeline” post on For You for a better explanation of the concept. And have fun!

The late 1970s and early 1980s punk scene in Minneapolis and St. Paul played host to a number of noteworthy groups: Hüsker Dü, the Replacements, the Suburbs. But none were as eclectic, or as underrated, as the multi-racial, gender- and genre-bending act known as the Rebels. A far cry from a conventional “punk” band, the Rebels were a motley crew of disaffected Northside funksters, suburban bar-band escapees, and even a few seasoned pros, whose wild live performances made them the first group from the Twin Cities underground to be signed by a major label. Their self-titled 1980 debut for Warner Bros. was both critically acclaimed and hugely influential for a generation of genre-agnostic musical provocateurs, but internal tensions kept them from fulfilling their full potential. Still, almost four decades later, the mark of the Rebels remains evident across the contemporary pop landscape, from alternative rock to electronic music and hip-hop.

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4 Paisley Park’s Consideration: 14 Rarities That Need to Be on the New Purple Rain Reissue

4 Paisley Park’s Consideration: 14 Rarities That Need to Be on the New Purple Rain Reissue

(Featured Image: Purple Rain, 1984; © Warner Bros.)

Well, it’s been a while. I honestly try to post here at least once a week (preferably twice), but work and travel have been conspiring this month to severely limit my productivity. I hope to be back with a real post next week. For now, though, here’s a piece I wrote over two years ago: way back when the 30th anniversary Purple Rain reissue that was just re-announced for release in 2017 was actually going to be a 30th anniversary reissue. Check out the tracks I’m hoping to see on the bonus disc, and feel free to let me know how wrong I am in the comments:

4 Paisley Park’s Consideration: 14 Rarities That Need to Be on the New Purple Rain Reissue

Have a great weekend–hopefully I’ll get the chance to post again before Halloween!