Prince Track by Track: “BOYTROUBLE”

Prince Track by Track: “BOYTROUBLE”

(Featured Image: Lizzo pays tribute to Prince in the music video for “Boys,” 2018; © Atlantic Records.)

It’s crazy to think about, but I’m nearing the end of my guest appearances on Darren Husted’s Prince: Track by Track podcast: just three more to go, one track each from ART OFFICIAL AGE and HITnRUN Phases One and Two. In the meantime, though, the topic is “BOYTROUBLE” from 2014’s PLECTRUMELECTRUM:

Prince Track by Track: “BOYTROUBLE”

This episode is serendipitously well-timed, since Lizzo–one of the featured artists on the track, who has really blown up in the last few years–is releasing her highly-anticipated third studio album Cuz I Love You next week. If all goes according to plan, I’ll be sharing a review of that album soon. And if all goes even more according to plan, I’ll have another track from Vanity 6 posted before then. Stay tuned!

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Podcast: Prince (1979) Revisited

Podcast: Prince (1979) Revisited

(Featured Image: Cover art for Prince, 1979; photo by Jurgen Reisch, © Warner Bros.)

October 19, 2018 marks the 39th anniversary of Prince’s self-titled second album–not the most glamorous occasion, perhaps, but reason enough to reassemble the review panel from our For You podcast for a reappraisal. Once again, Zach is joined by Harold and KaNisa for a track-by-track discussion of this underappreciated album, its resonances throughout Prince’s career, and why it still matters.

If you want to keep in the loop for our forthcoming Dirty Mind podcast, you can subscribe to dance / music / sex / romance on your aggregator of choice (iTunesStitcher, or Google Play); and if you like what we’re doing and want to spread the word, please leave us a review! In the meantime, the d / m / s / r blog will return next week with one last track from 1981.

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Still Waiting

Still Waiting

(Featured Image: Sam Cooke by Michael Ochs, 1959.)

In late 1979, an interview with Prince appeared in the African American teen magazine Right On! The interviewer, Cynthia Horner, was one of the up-and-coming artist’s earliest champions in the media, yet even she was not spared the usual quirks of his interactions with the press; to her growing exasperation, Prince spent most of the article deflecting her questions with flirtatious evasions. But then, just as Horner seemed about to give up and asked him the hoariest teen-mag question in the book–does he have a girlfriend?–Prince gave a response that feels disarmingly real: “I had one but she left me. I wrote some songs about it on the album.” At her expression of disbelief–“Do you know how many young ladies would love to fill her shoes?”–he replied,  “That’s why she left me” (Horner 1979).

It’s perhaps a tribute to Prince’s growing facility as a pop songwriter in 1979 that I never suspected the songs of love and heartbreak on his second album were inspired by real women; they feel much too universal in their vagueness, like the dozens of songs for imaginary girls by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. And yet, Prince suggested to Horner–and the various biographies agree–that several of his songs from around this period were inspired by his early girlfriend, Kim Upsher. Upsher, you might recall, was probably Prince’s first “serious” relationship; when he moved into his house on France Avenue in Edina, she was the one who helped decorate and made it feel like a home, rather than a glorified studio space. Due to the deliberate fudging of Prince’s age around this time, she’s often assumed to have been his high-school sweetheart; biographers Alex Hahn and Laura Tiebert, however, have clarified that they didn’t begin dating until around the time he signed to Warner Bros.–though he did apparently nurse an intense crush for her in high school, while she was seeing his close friend Paul Mitchell (Hahn 2017).

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4 Paisley Park’s Consideration: The NPG Era Needs Its Own “4Ever”

4 Paisley Park’s Consideration: The NPG Era Needs Its Own “4Ever”

(Featured Image: Booklet from Emancipation, 1996; © NPG Records.)

Here’s a follow-up to last week’s guest post on Andresmusictalk, this time pitching a collection that does for Prince’s “NPG era” what Prince 4Ever did for the Warner years:

4 Paisley Park’s Consideration: The NPG Era Needs Its Own “4Ever”

Next week, more 1978 home recordings you probably don’t remember or care about. I’ll try to make them interesting, though!