After 4Ever: Why We’re Still Waiting for a Definitive Prince Compilation

After 4Ever: Why We’re Still Waiting for a Definitive Prince Compilation

(Featured Image: Prince by Herb Ritts, from the 4Ever booklet; © NPG Records/Warner Bros.)

I know I wrote a lot about “Moonbeam Levels” earlier this week, but it turns out I had a lot more to say about Prince 4Ever (you’ve probably noticed, I always have a lot to say). So here’s a rundown of Prince’s compilations from 1993 to 2016, what each gets right, and why even now, we still need a truly definitive set. Check it out at Andresmusictalk below:

After 4Ever: Why We’re Still Waiting for a Definitive Prince Compilation

Next week, it’s back to the post-For You grind with a couple of light, but pleasant outtakes from mid-1978. See you then!

Moonbeam Levels

Moonbeam Levels

(Featured Image: Prince 4Ever, 2016; photo by Justine Walpole, © NPG Records/Warner Bros.)

This Monday, November 21, marked the seven-month “anniversary” of Prince’s untimely passing. A day later, we got the first officially-sanctioned posthumous release of his music: Prince 4Ever, a two-disc (or, for those like me living firmly in the digital era, 40-track) compilation spanning the 15 years from the release of his 1978 debut album to his acrimonious 1993 falling-out with Warner Bros. Records. Most of 4Ever is, quite frankly, not for People Like Us: the majority of its track listing overlaps with previous compilations UltimateThe Very Best of Prince, and The Hits/The B-Sides–still the O.G., as far as I’m concerned–and more often than not the versions included are the vastly inferior single edits. There are a few previously uncompiled mixes (most notably a blessedly rap-free “Alphabet St.”), as well as some deeper cuts: “Glam Slam” from 1988’s Lovesexy makes its first appearance on CD as an individually-sequenced track, and the 1989 movie tie-in “Batdance” is collected for the first time since its initial release. I also appreciate the sprinkling of fan-favorite songs, like the (amazing) 1981 U.K.-only release “Gotta Stop (Messin’ About)” and the (even more amazing) 1986 single “Mountains.” In general, though, if you’re reading this blog, there is nothing here you haven’t heard before–with one possible exception. I’m talking, of course, about “Moonbeam Levels.”

Recorded toward the end of the 1999 sessions in July of 1982, “Moonbeam Levels” has been circulating since the mid-to-late 1980s, when it was initially mislabeled as “A Better Place 2 Die.” It’s acquired a reputation in the ensuing decades as one of the best, and best-known, outtakes in Prince’s voluminous catalogue. In 2013, the song even received a few noteworthy public performances: first by Elvis Costello with Princess (a.k.a. Maya Rudolph and Gretchen Lieberum) at a Carnegie Hall tribute to Prince, and later by the man himself, as part of a piano medley supporting protégée Shelby J at the City Winery in New York. Now, you know I have all kinds of opinions about Prince outtakes, but I’m not even gonna front: “Moonbeam Levels” was a great choice for the first officially-released “bootleg” to see the light of day after Prince’s death. So, now that it’s finally seen a legitimate release, I think it’s more than appropriate for us to put our usual chronological content on hold and take a closer look at the song.

Continue reading “Moonbeam Levels”

More Guest Posts on Andresmusictalk

More Guest Posts on Andresmusictalk

(Featured Image: Apollonia 6 in their final photo shoot, circa 1985; photo stolen from prince.org.)

Well, folks, it’s Saturday afternoon, and that means another guest post about Prince protégés on Andresmusictalk. This week, I’m digging in to the short, widely-misunderstood discography of Vanity and Apollonia 6. As with last Saturday’s post on the Time, there’s a lot left to say, but just consider it a preview for a more extended discussion on this blog:

Prince (Protégé) Summer: Vanity/Apollonia 6

You can also check out the bonus guest post from yesterday, in which Andre and I discuss our favorite 12″ Prince singles. I think my favorite might be “Mountains”; what’s yours?

Grooves on Wax, Prince Summer Edition

On Tuesday, I’ll be back with our first piece of ephemera from the For You era. Have a great weekend!

Dystopian Movie Party Podcast: 30 Years Under the Cherry Moon

Dystopian Movie Party Podcast: 30 Years Under the Cherry Moon

(Featured Image: Just bro stuff in Under the Cherry Moon, 1986; © Warner Bros.)

As promised/threatened, I’m once again interrupting the usual flow for a Prince-related feature from our sister site Dystopian Dance Party. Today, Callie and I talk about our mutual, misguided, only semi-ironic love for the second installment of Prince’s cinematic saga, Under the Cherry Moon, which released 30 years ago this Monday. Tune in for lots of incredulous laughter, and one moment in which I actually compare the film to Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless (don’t worry, it makes slightly more sense in context). And of course, feel free to check out Dystopian Dance Party, which is where I write about whatever I feel like writing at any given time (though, unsurprisingly, there’s a lot of Prince on there, too). Show notes here. See you next week!